Mildenhall Anglican Church
The warm summer days will soon be turning to days with more of a chill in the air. Already some leaves are browning, as conkers, acorns, nuts and berries are forming. As the daylight shortens may we be ever more urgent in our prayers for the light of peace to change the darkness of war.
The call for 100 days of prayer of peace, hope and reconciliation to mark the 100 years is a poignant inter-denominational opportunity to work together for peace.

Roy Crowne Executive director, HOPE reminds us of the aspiration behind Remembrance 100:
On 4 August 1918 King George V, the Queen’s grandfather, met to pray with members of the Houses of Parliament as part of a National Day of Prayer. One hundred days later, the war ended.
We have compiled these 100 thoughts and prayers for peace, together with ideas to promote peace and reconciliation, to encourage churches, schools and communities to reflect on the past and bring hope for the future. These thoughts, prayers and peace-making actions can be used by individuals and groups at any time, but especially in the 100 days leading up to Armistice Day on 11th November. We are grateful to the Archbishop of Canterbury and to the many Christian denominations, ministries and chaplaincies who have contributed these readings and prayers for peace as we continue to pray for peace in our time.

Justin Welby Archbishop of Canterbury writes:
REMEMBRANCE & RECONCILIATION.
When we remember 1918, we reflect on a time of great hope and great sadness for our country. We recall our part in the horrors of war and the darkness that drives humanity to violence. But we also remember the promise of peace. On 4 August 1918, many in this country came together with King George V to pray for peace: 100 days later the Great War ended.
Our God is one who brings peace to hearts and calls us not only to stop violence, but to seek reconciliation. His reconciliation asks that we disempower memories of destruction and their hold over individuals and societies. Through this we can learn to approach difference with curiosity and compassion, rather than fear – and begin to flourish together in previously unthinkable ways.  This kind of reconciliation is incredibly rare.
Sadly, we see conflicts and fragile coexistence all around our world. That is why in the 100 days before this Remembrance Sunday, we think especially of those caught up in conflict, and those who pray for peace against all odds and act with hope when there is little light to be seen. We know that the God who gave his Son to bring us reconciliation hears their prayers; we ask him to stir our hearts to join them in being peacemakers who cross the borders and barriers, radical in our generosity and welcome.
If you are already praying please continue. If not it’s not too to join in. Material to guide your praying is available- download from Rembrance100.co.uk.


You could light a candle and keep two minutes silence as you pray for peace

There is so much conflict around the world- our every prayer can make a difference.

“ Now may the Lord of peace himself give you peace at all times and in every way. The Lord be with all of you”. 2 Thessalonians 3:16 (NIV)








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